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Distant freedom"St Helena and the abolition of the slave trade, 1840-1872"$
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Andrew Pearson

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781781382837

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781382837.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

A Place of Immense Advantage

A Place of Immense Advantage

Chapter:
(p.13) Chapter One A Place of Immense Advantage
Source:
Distant freedom
Author(s):

Andrew Pearson

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781382837.003.0002

This chapter offers an historical overview of St Helena’s Liberated African Establishment, from its inception in 1840 to its final closure in the late 1860s. This period spans the final era of the slave trade to Brazil and Cuba. There is a strong narrative element to this chapter – something that is entirely necessary for events that are little known and which have never been accurately set down. The history of the Establishment is framed by the attempts to disband it: in 1844, at several points in the mid-1850s, and finally in 1867. These island-based events reflected wider geo-political circumstances, which in turn go a long way to explaining the ebb and flow of slave ship prizes that the Royal Navy brought to St Helena. But, whilst they provide a convenient structure, they do so only in hindsight. St Helena’s Liberated African Establishment was a permanent impermanence: nearly always operational, but perennially on the brink of closure.

Keywords:   Brazil, Cuba, Historical overview, Liberated African Establishment, Royal Navy, Slave Trade

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