Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Bourdieu and Postcolonial Studies$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Raphael Dalleo

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781781382967

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781781382967.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 01 June 2020

Postcolonial Authorship Revisited (from Postcolonial Writers in the Global Literary Marketplace)

Postcolonial Authorship Revisited (from Postcolonial Writers in the Global Literary Marketplace)

Chapter:
(p.80) Chapter Three Postcolonial Authorship Revisited (from Postcolonial Writers in the Global Literary Marketplace)
Source:
Bourdieu and Postcolonial Studies
Author(s):

Sarah Brouillette

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781781382967.003.0004

This chapter discusses how postcolonial authors have positioned themselves within what Pierre Bourdieu described as the field of cultural production, emphasizing in particular the impact of corporatization and globalization on the field. It argues, then, that there are limitations to Bourdieu’s approach for understanding this material. Most notably, in his vision of the cultural scene people are interested in literary esteem or material wealth or some combination of these. Other interests – aesthetic or political aims, for instance – fade into the background, or are read in relation to the primary goal of winning prestige and, with prestige, the right to control the rules of the game. In addition, despite his terminology – delineating symbolic, cultural, and economic capitals – the foundational elements of capitalist exchange and capitalist social relations, which determine how the cultural field functions, do not figure strongly enough in his approach. 

Keywords:   publishing studies, publishing industry, Pierre Bourdieu, postcolonial literature

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.