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Transnational Radicalism and the Connected Lives of Tom Mann and Robert Samuel Ross$
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Neville Kirk

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781786940094

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781786940094.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 18 September 2021

World War I and its Aftermath

World War I and its Aftermath

Chapter:
(p.226) 7 World War I and its Aftermath
Source:
Transnational Radicalism and the Connected Lives of Tom Mann and Robert Samuel Ross
Author(s):

Neville Kirk

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781786940094.003.0008

The final chapter considers the ways in which Mann’s and Ross’s commitments to labour-movement unity and wider working-class solidarity fared in the face of the highly divisive issues of war, militarism, imperialism, peace, patriotism, loyalism, internationalism, conscription, revolution and counter-revolution surrounding the period of World War One and its aftermath. It shows that while Mann and Ross continued to preach peace, opposition to the ‘imperialist’ war and conscription, Ross was far more active and outspoken in his anti-war activities than Mann and as a consequence suffered imprisonment and declining health. The pacifism of Ross, indeed, is to be contrasted with Mann’s commitment to taking the war to a successful conclusion against ‘Prussianism’. In 1917 both Mann and Ross welcomed the ‘emancipatory’ Russian Revolution and staunchly opposed the politics of counter-revolution and ‘loyalism’. Yet while Mann embraced communism, Ross found a home in the radicalised Australian Labor Party and rejected the Bolshevik model for democratic Australia. The case of Mann and Ross casts important new light upon the general issues of labour’s and workers’ attitudes to war and peace, revolution and reaction, patriotism and loyalism and communism and social democracy.

Keywords:   War, Peace, Freedom, Ross, Mann

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