Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Crime, Violence and the Irish in the Nineteenth Century$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Kyle Hughes and Donald MacRaild

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781786940650

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781786940650.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 12 July 2020

Constitutional Rhetoric as Legal Defence: Irish Lawyers and the Languages of Political Dissent in 1848

Constitutional Rhetoric as Legal Defence: Irish Lawyers and the Languages of Political Dissent in 1848

Chapter:
(p.112) 6 Constitutional Rhetoric as Legal Defence: Irish Lawyers and the Languages of Political Dissent in 1848
Source:
Crime, Violence and the Irish in the Nineteenth Century
Author(s):

Colin W. Reid

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781786940650.003.0007

This chapter reminds us of the importance of Irish lawyers in nineteenth- century political and constitutional debates. Utilising the treason-felony and sedition charges that were brought against the young Irelanders in 1848, the essay shows that their legal defences were ‘saturated in political dissent’ and makes the often-overlooked point that the courtroom was a theatre not only for the accused but for those who held the defence and prosecution briefs as well. The impassioned ‘speeches from the dock’ of successive Irish political prisoners—from tone and Emmet through to the young Irelanders and the Fenians—formed a cornerstone of Irish nationalist culture and development during the nineteenth century. As the essay brings to light, however, the lawyers also helped secure their place in the public spotlight through the medium of judicial rhetoric. For men such as Isaac Butt and James Whiteside in 1848, the courtroom provided a forum to express Irish Conservative unease with the workings of British constitution in Ireland.

Keywords:   Irish lawyers, Young Ireland, Isaac Butt, Speeches from the dock, Irish nationalism

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.