Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Crime, Violence and the Irish in the Nineteenth Century$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Kyle Hughes and Donald MacRaild

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781786940650

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781786940650.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 27 July 2021

‘Loyal to the Crown but not the Crown’s Government’: The Challenge to Policing Posed by the Orange Order in 1830s Ulster

‘Loyal to the Crown but not the Crown’s Government’: The Challenge to Policing Posed by the Orange Order in 1830s Ulster

Chapter:
(p.193) 10 ‘Loyal to the Crown but not the Crown’s Government’: The Challenge to Policing Posed by the Orange Order in 1830s Ulster
Source:
Crime, Violence and the Irish in the Nineteenth Century
Author(s):

Daragh Curran

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781786940650.003.0011

The strength of the Orange Order in early nineteenth-century Ulster, if at first a boon, was later a cause of concern for successive British governments. From local magistrates at petty sessions through to William Saurin, the Attorney General, Orangeism permeated the administration of law and order in the northern province. A radical shake up of the justice system, including the establishment of a new constabulary force, was undertaken during the 1820s and 1830s. This chapter explores the reactions of the Orange Order to the new police and in the process augments the extant literature on the ‘conditional loyalty’ of Ulster loyalism. Purges of Orangemen from the magistracy during the 1830s, the disbandment of the yeomanry in 1833, and the enforcement by the constabulary (in some instances at least) of the prohibition on assemblies and arches, fuelled Orange rage and prompted violent resistance to the forces of law and order. This essay posits that Ulster Orangemen could not countenance the possibility that the laws upheld and administered by Dublin Castle could apply to loyal citizens such as themselves. As a result, their disobedience towards the police in the years immediately following Emancipation ran contrary to the rules of the Orange Institution to uphold the law.

Keywords:   Orange Order, Sectarianism, Religious violence, Ulster, Irish police

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.