Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
London UndergroundA Cultural Geography$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

David Ashford

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781846318597

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781846318597.001.0000

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 29 May 2020

Making a Home in Modernity

Making a Home in Modernity

The Conceptual History of Metroland

Chapter:
(p.93) 4 Making a Home in Modernity
Source:
London Underground
Author(s):

David Ashford

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846318597.003.0005

This approach already characterised the concept of the suburban embodied by ‘Metroland’. Chapter Four begins with a radical revisionist reading of H.G. Wells’ The Time Machine that establishes that the earliest version of this tale was a response, not to class-segregation in the Vertical City, but to the spatial fragmentation of the intelligentsia in the nineties (into the decadent and scientifically-minded) resulting from the centrifugal force exerted upon the capital by the railways. The fable is an attack on the ideal of the Underground Garden Suburb, on that conceptual space that would later be embodied by Metroland, the archetypal suburban landscape north-west of London, created in the inter-war period by the Metropolitan Railway. Like H.G. Wells before them, the avant-gardes vituperated this environment for its messy escapism and its individualism. But in the wake of WWII the space underwent a re-evaluation which recognised that, with the immense scope it provided for the expression of personal taste, its formal indeterminacy ought to be valued in a machine-age operating on a superhuman scale. The architectural critic J.M. Richards, and writers John Betjeman and Julian Barnes, praised Metroland for remaining loyal to the significance of the individual, forgiving Metroland its various faults, they point out that in this space fantasy is functional.

Keywords:   METROLAND, SUBURBANISM, GARDEN CITIES, H.G WELLS, E.M. FORSTER, GEORGE ORWELL, J.B. PRIESTLY, J.M. RICHARDS, JOHN BETJEMAN, JULIAN BARNES

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.