Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Poetry & GeographySpace & Place in Post-war Poetry$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Neal Alexander and David Cooper

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781846318641

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781846318641.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 21 May 2022

‘Wanderer, Incomer, Borderer/Liar, Mother of Everything I See’: Jo Shapcott's Engagement with Landscape, Art and Poetry

‘Wanderer, Incomer, Borderer/Liar, Mother of Everything I See’: Jo Shapcott's Engagement with Landscape, Art and Poetry

Chapter:
(p.163) Chapter 11 ‘Wanderer, Incomer, Borderer/Liar, Mother of Everything I See’: Jo Shapcott's Engagement with Landscape, Art and Poetry
Source:
Poetry & Geography
Author(s):

Deryn Rees-Jones

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846318641.003.0012

This essay illustrates how Jo Shapcott draws upon a series of poetic precursors – including Rainer Maria Rilke, Elizabeth Bishop and Ralph Waldo Emerson – to offer a feminist intervention into the postmodern rupture of landscape and language. The essay maps out a complex intertextual network of association and allusion to show how Shapcott's embodied poems of space and place attempt to discover provisional resolutions to emplaced questions of identity, experience and representation. Particular emphasis is placed on the way in which – through an engagement with the visual art practice of Helen Chadwick – Shapcott's collection, Of Mutability (2010), demonstrates the writer's wish to deconstruct and refuse binaries. The essay argues, however, that such impulses do not lead to a displacement and a loss of self but, rather, a relocation of the self through a mutable landscape.

Keywords:   Jo Shapcott, Poetry, Landscape, Rainer Maria Rilke, Elizabeth Bishop, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Helen Chadwick, Body, Mutability

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.