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Intimate EnemiesTranslation in Francophone Contexts$
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Kathryn Batchelor and Claire Bisdorff

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781846318672

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781846318672.001.0001

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Subverting Subversion? Translation Practice and Malpractice in the Work of Patrick Chamoiseau

Subverting Subversion? Translation Practice and Malpractice in the Work of Patrick Chamoiseau

Chapter:
(p.161) Subverting Subversion? Translation Practice and Malpractice in the Work of Patrick Chamoiseau
Source:
Intimate Enemies
Author(s):

Carol Gilogley

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846318672.003.0012

The tensions inherent in the departmentalized/ ‘postcolonial’ Antillean dynamic resonate throughout Chamoiseau's créoliste counter-poetics, making his narratives a crucial subject of study. However, this article proposes that Chamoiseau's subversive logic of opposition is, in fact, frequently subverted in translation, a ‘domination furtive’ which threatens its coherence. Using detailed critical analysis of the ‘oraliture’ of the contes créoles of Au temps de l’antan (1988) and its translation, Linda Coverdale's Creole Folktales (1994), this study examines the treatment of key ideological elements in Chamoiseau's subversive toolkit, and considers the extent to which such strategies might constitute ‘decolonizing’ or ‘recolonizing’ translation practices. By examining the interlectal creolisms, code-switching, textual equality and deflective opacity of the créoliste imaginary at work in Au temps de l’antan, this study sets Creole Folktales in the context of other translations of Chamoiseau's work, as well as the more global dynamic of ‘minority’ translation.

Keywords:   Chamoiseau, Coverdale, Au temps de l’antan, Creole Folktales, French Antilles, Translation

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