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Pubs and PatriotsThe Drink Crisis in Britain during World War One$
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Robert Duncan

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9781846318955

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781846318955.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

‘Helping our weaker sisters to go straight’: Women and Drink during the War

‘Helping our weaker sisters to go straight’: Women and Drink during the War

Chapter:
(p.150) Chapter Six ‘Helping our weaker sisters to go straight’: Women and Drink during the War
Source:
Pubs and Patriots
Author(s):

Robert Duncan

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846318955.003.0006

This chapter will show that perceptions of female drinking was a key component of the drink crisis. During the war it was believed that an increased number of women were drinking larger amounts of alcohol than ever before. Contemporary evidence differs with regard to the scale of the problem, making it difficult for the historian to come to definite conclusions. Indeed, much evidence is simply contradictory. What is known for certain, though, is that female drinking became emblematic of the broader desire to regulate certain sections of society for the supposed benefit of the war effort. The corruption of women became emblematic of Britain’s failure to regulate drinking. As a result the CCB conducted a special investigation concerning female drinking.

Keywords:   Female intoxication, Perceptions of drinkers, Morality, Louise Creighton, Women, Pubs

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