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Black IntersectionalitiesA Critique for the 21st Century$
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Monica Michlin and Jean-Paul Rocchi

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781846319389

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781846319389.001.0001

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Introduction: Theorizing for Change: Intersections, Transdisciplinarity, and Black Lived Experience

Introduction: Theorizing for Change: Intersections, Transdisciplinarity, and Black Lived Experience

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 Introduction: Theorizing for Change: Intersections, Transdisciplinarity, and Black Lived Experience
Source:
Black Intersectionalities
Author(s):

Monica Michlin

Jean-Paul Rocchi

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846319389.003.0001

Rather than nostalgically returning to the Combahee River Collective and discarding the academic benefits of interdisciplinarity which span the last two decades, this introduction ponders the possibility of an ethical shift towards a greater articulation of discourses and social movements while claiming that this interrelatedness should be the primary intersection. Through the essays of the collection it examines the generative conditions of theory; its possible limitations; and the methodological innovations needed when the theorization of the lived experience of black people aims at implementing lasting social change. Within the original metaphorical evocation of “traffic intersections” conjuring up the flux of ever-changing individual and collective identities and their cross-pollinization, it argues that intersectionality should not, however, be reduced to a sheer concept or to a symbol describing any subject position – a current academic trend which depoliticizes intersectionality by applying it to all, in any situation. Intersectionality is a tool; perhaps even a weapon. As such, it needs to be thought through and used by those of us for whom policies of inequality and discrimination still matter because they are an inescapable condition of our existence.

Keywords:   agency, black being, blackness, critique, gender, identity, intersectionality, positionality, sexuality, theorization

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