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Black IntersectionalitiesA Critique for the 21st Century$
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Monica Michlin and Jean-Paul Rocchi

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781846319389

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781846319389.001.0001

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Exordium: Writing and the Relation: From Textual Coloniality to South African Black Consciousness1

Exordium: Writing and the Relation: From Textual Coloniality to South African Black Consciousness1

Chapter:
(p.21) 2 Exordium: Writing and the Relation: From Textual Coloniality to South African Black Consciousness1
Source:
Black Intersectionalities
Author(s):

Rozena Maart

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846319389.003.0002

How do writers consider the representation of human relations, and particularly between characters with various racial, gender-related, sexual, or national (self)identifications? This chapter will address the theme of “Writing and the Relation” by offering a tour-de-Azania – Azania being the indigenous name of South Africa – of what writing means when inscribing relations of blood, sex, gender and sexuality, inking blood in textual coloniality, under and between apartheid's reign when its tongue was twisted, locked in a tight vaginal grip with the British Empire and its allies, when forced removal of the slave quarter and its people was instituted, when the psyche staged its protest upon the body, when the psyche pierced through traumatised flesh and became the body. This tour-de Azania will be spiked with the memory of Edouard Glissant’s Creole words that spoke the forbidden, Biko’s fisted smile that fought for freedom, Fanon’s fearless fight in bringing the mind into the centre of colonial discourse, Paulette Nardal’s soirées where she hosted discourses of negritude in Paris on dinner plates, Derrida’s determination to reveal White Mythology, Lillian Ngoyi’s march against the militaristic laws of apartheid – these are the relations through which Black Consciousness is revealed.

Keywords:   Steve Biko, black consciousness, the body, British Empire, coloniality, the psyche, South Africa, writing and the relation

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