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Before the WindrushRace Relations in 20th-Century Liverpool$
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John Belchem

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781846319679

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781846319679.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 04 April 2020

‘The most disturbing case of racial disadvantage in the United Kingdom’1

‘The most disturbing case of racial disadvantage in the United Kingdom’1

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction ‘The most disturbing case of racial disadvantage in the United Kingdom’1
Source:
Before the Windrush
Author(s):

John Belchem

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846319679.003.0001

The Introduction provides a chronological overview, outlining a period of dramatic change as ‘cosmopolitan’ Liverpool, having rebranded and repositioned itself after abolition of the slave trade, became the pre-eminent multi-racial hub of the British Empire at its height. A century later’ however, it had a different complexion, being registered in the census as one of the least ethnically varied cities in the country with only small numbers of ‘new Commonwealth’ migrants. While considered within broad processes of imperialism, decolonization and economic decline, changes in Liverpool's demographic mosaic need to be examined and explained within the city's troubled framework of pioneer race relations, the adverse consequences of which were belatedly recognised by politicians and policy makers.

Keywords:   slave trade, race relations, cosmopolitan, multi-racial, imperialism, migrants

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