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Before the WindrushRace Relations in 20th-Century Liverpool$
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John Belchem

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9781846319679

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781846319679.001.0001

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Repatriation, reconstruction and post-war race relations

Repatriation, reconstruction and post-war race relations

Chapter:
(p.121) Chapter Four Repatriation, reconstruction and post-war race relations
Source:
Before the Windrush
Author(s):

John Belchem

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781846319679.003.0005

As this chapter shows, innovative ‘community’ proposals suggested that black Liverpudlians were to be included within the post-war construction of Britishness. However, there was no desire for any increase in their numbers. In a reprise of events after the First World War, the Home Office ensured the deportation of the ‘alien’ Chinese, while the Colonial Office encouraged the repatriation of ‘coloured’ colonials. Progress on community projects such as the flagship Stanley House was tortuously slow as the local authority refused to infringe its ‘colour-blind’ impartiality to acknowledge purported special needs, while well-meaning voluntary agencies worried lest any specific provision might prove counter-productive, reinforcing the feeling of segregation. Liverpool remained at the very forefront of concern about race relations in the post-war years and into the 1950s as new forms of black organization emerged, more militant than either the middle-class League of Coloured Peoples or Ekarte's spiritual mission.

Keywords:   Britishness, repatriation, deportation, Chinese, ‘colour-blind’ policy, segregation

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