Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Virginia Woolf and Her Female Contemporaries$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Julie Vandivere and Megan Hicks

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781942954088

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781942954088.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM LIVERPOOL SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.liverpool.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Liverpool University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in LSO for personal use.date: 03 June 2020

“Quota Quickies Threaten Audience Intelligence Levels!”: The Power of the Screen in Virginia Woolf’s “The Cinema” and “Middlebrow” and Betty Miller’s Farewell Leicester Square

“Quota Quickies Threaten Audience Intelligence Levels!”: The Power of the Screen in Virginia Woolf’s “The Cinema” and “Middlebrow” and Betty Miller’s Farewell Leicester Square

Chapter:
(p.86) “Quota Quickies Threaten Audience Intelligence Levels!”: The Power of the Screen in Virginia Woolf’s “The Cinema” and “Middlebrow” and Betty Miller’s Farewell Leicester Square
Source:
Virginia Woolf and Her Female Contemporaries
Author(s):

Sarah Cornish

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781942954088.003.0012

In 1926, Virginia Woolf wrote “The Cinema,” in which she expresses both her fascination for and her worry about the movies’ powerful influence over its spectators. Later, in “Middlebrow” (1932), she facetiously suggests that this power of the movies is useful for managing and preserving distinctions of both class and taste. This chapter uses Woolf’s suggestions about film culture to explore Betty Miller’s direct engagement with the film industry in her novel Farewell Leicester Square (1941) in light of the 1927 Cinematographic Film Act. The Act required cinema houses in the UK to show a certain percentage of films made in Britain and by British directors and resulted in the phenomenon of the “Quota Quickie,” films made on a two-week shooting schedule and a slim budget. The Quota Quickie phenomenon reached a peak in 1935 and 1936, the years in which the UK produced its most narrative films. Miller’s Farewell Leicester Square, written at the height of the industry boom in 1935, the chapter argues, is a “meta-filmic” novel about the British film industry and culture during the interwar period.

Keywords:   Film, Betty Miller, Virginia Woolf, Middlebrow, Taste, National Identity, Jewish, Britishness, Race, Class

Liverpool Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.