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Virginia Woolf and Heritage$
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Jane deGay, Tom Breckin, and Anne Reus

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781942954422

Published to Liverpool Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.5949/liverpool/9781942954422.001.0001

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Out-takes from Upstarts: Virginia Woolf, Jane Ellen Harrison, and the Heritage of Dissent, or, “There She Wasn’t?”

Out-takes from Upstarts: Virginia Woolf, Jane Ellen Harrison, and the Heritage of Dissent, or, “There She Wasn’t?”

Chapter:
(p.42) Out-takes from Upstarts: Virginia Woolf, Jane Ellen Harrison, and the Heritage of Dissent, or, “There She Wasn’t?”
Source:
Virginia Woolf and Heritage
Author(s):

Jean Mills

Publisher:
Liverpool University Press
DOI:10.5949/liverpool/9781942954422.003.0005

Jean Mills uses Virginia Woolf’s legacy and literature to process the work and impact of two important women in her life, the Virginia Woolf scholar, Jane Marcus, and her own mother, following their deaths. In her attempts to preserve and champion the memory of the two women, Mills acknowledges Woolf’s own participation in the act of writing women into obscurity and refers to Jane Harrison’s title of ‘J.H’ in A Room of One’s Own. Mills argues that not using the scholar’s full name contributes to Harrison’s erasure and reveals Woolf’s act of distancing between herself and her female role models. While Mills attributes Woolf’s sense of isolation from her academic audience as a result of distancing and alienation, she acknowledges that many of Woolf’s narratives privileged women’s history and experience, and observes that any presence of ambivalence can be utilised as a necessary tool to foreground the need for the recognition of women in activism and political thought.

Keywords:   Virginia Woolf, Jane Ellen Harrison, archive, gender, intellectual history

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